Archive for June, 2011

Tim Pawlenty’s Economic Plan: Lies and Lunacy – The Daily Beast


* – + * * print * Twitter * Email * Share *A candidate’s economic plan usually inspires discussion and selective disagreement. But as Michael Tomasky argues, Tim Pawlenty’s plan is pure nonsense.Picking the biggest and most pernicious conservative lie of our times is about as enviable a job as naming the most undeserved bonus at AIG. The same goes for picking the biggest conservative liar—though Tim Pawlenty has now arguably made himself the frontrunner (for that title at least). In the economic plan he announced this week, Pawlenty took my choice for No. 1 lie as his starting point. And it got worse from there.

Tim Pawlenty’s Economic Plan: Lies and Lunacy – The Daily Beast

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Lifting The Veil Exposing The Truth For It Is


Lifting the Veil from S DN on Vimeo.

Not Welcome In My Backyard


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This is a 25 minute short proposal for the long form documentary feature entitled NOT WELCOME by Eric Allen Bell.

NOT FOR COMMERCIAL DISTRIBUTION

The website is not up yet. This is just an early rough cut to show friends.

CONTACT: Eric@BellMedia.org

American Banks ‘High’ On Drug Money: How a Whistleblower Blew the Lid Off Wachovia-Drug Cartel Money Laundering Scheme | | AlterNet


A fraud investigator helped expose the shocking world of multi-billion dollar drug laundering by American banks and the surprising lack of oversight by the Feds.

American Banks ‘High’ On Drug Money: How a Whistleblower Blew the Lid Off Wachovia-Drug Cartel Money Laundering Scheme | | AlterNet

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Republicans Losing Their Advantage on How to Handle the Deficit, Poll Finds


A new poll released Wednesday echoes what a Washington Post/ABC News poll reported a day earlier: President Obama doesn’t get good marks for his handling of issues involving the economy, but faith in Republicans doing a better job has slipped.While the way the questions were framed in the Post/ABC News poll was different from the one by the Pew Research Center — the Post/ABC survey focused on the economy in general and the Pew poll focused on dealing with the deficit — the results point to a similar trend suggesting a drop in enthusiasm for Republican policies since the party won big in last year’s midterm elections.The Post/ABC News poll found a majority disapproving of Obama’s handling of the economy, but those surveyed still said they trusted him more to do a better job in dealing with the issue than the Republicans.

Republicans Losing Their Advantage on How to Handle the Deficit, Poll Finds

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sent the Dow Jones Industrial Average to the first close below 12000 since mid-March


NEW YORK—Another dose of anguish about the global economic recovery sent the Dow Jones Industrial Average to the first close below 12000 since mid-March, capping the blue-chip index’s longest weekly slump since 2002.

Another dose of anguish about the global economic recovery sent the Dow to the first close below 12000 since mid-March, capping the blue-chip index’s longest weekly slump since 2002. Paul Vigna discusses.

The Dow industrials sank 172.45 points, or 1.4%, to 11951.91, the sixth straight week of declines. The Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index shed 18.02, or 1.4%, to 1270.98. That broad index also has notched six weeks of declines, the longest losing streak since 2008.

Two closely watched stock indexes turned negative for the year Friday. The Nasdaq Composite Index fell 41.14, or 1.5%, to 2643.73. The small-capitalization Russell 2000 fell 13.10, or 1.7%, to 779.54.

Investors were dour after U.S. May import prices showed a surprise rise of 0.2%, hinting at an inflation push coming into the U.S. from abroad. Overseas, sovereign-debt worries continued to rattle investors, pushing European stocks lower. A surprise interest-rate increase by the Bank of Korea weighed on Asian bourses.

The action follows a string of weak readings on the U.S. economy that have joined with pessimism about weaker global growth to weigh on major stock indexes. Unsurprisingly, the mood on the trading floor was grim.

“At the moment there doesn’t seem to be any place to hide,” said Ted Weisberg, pres

sent the Dow Jones Industrial Average to the first close below 12000 since mid-March

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Bring on the grand bargain – The Hill’s Pundits Blog


Congratulations to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) for explicitly calling on Democrats and Republicans to hold hands and jump together on a bipartisan agreement to curb the growth of Medicare spending. He didn’t just say Medicare was on the table, he said he would insist on “significant changes” to the program in exchange for voting to raise the debt ceiling. After some Republicans had backed away from Medicare reform in recent weeks, McConnell insisted action on Medicare take place now in order to deny both parties a political weapon in the 2012 election. McConnell’s comments came after Senate Republicans met with President Obama. His willingness to cooperate on a grand bargain is notable since McConnell was also involved in the deal the president struck in December with Republicans to extend the Bush tax cuts. McConnell pointed out — correctly — that the options for Medicare reform are well-known, and do not need months of time to be vetted; decisions require compromise, not more information. “The things I’m talking about have already been studied to death. We don’t need any more hearings,” McConnell said. “We know what the options are. The only question is, what will we pick up and agree to on a bipartisan basis?” As I described in my column this week, House Republicans began walking back their intentions to tackle a Medicare overhaul contained in the GOP budget drafted by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and passed by the House last month in recent statements about the political realities that would prevent the plan from being passed by the Senate. They have now declared they remain committed to their plan, which was attacked by Democrats and questioned by some constituents when members returned for the spring recess. Though McConnell made it clear he would not insist on the Ryan plan for Medicare overhaul, and would not insist on changes to Social Security, he said Medicare reforms should include limiting eligibility and reducing benefits. Medicare, which is highly popular, remains politically charged, and McConnell said the debt-ceiling debate provides an opportunity to “do something important for the country together” and address a problem the parties are usually unwilling to touch. “If there is a grand bargain of some kind with the president of the United States, none of it will be usable for either side in next year’s election — none of it.” Bring on the grand bargain.

Bring on the grand bargain – The Hill’s Pundits Blog

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