Archive for January 16th, 2012

Martin Luther King Jr. His Time And Story


 


Martin Luther King, Jr., (January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968) was born Michael Luther King, Jr., but later had his name changed to Martin. His grandfather began the family’s long tenure as pastors of the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, serving from 1914 to 1931; his father has served from then until the present, and from 1960 until his death Martin Luther acted as co-pastor. Martin Luther attended segregated public schools in Georgia, graduating from high school at the age of fifteen; he received the B. A. degree in 1948 from Morehouse College, a distinguished Negro institution of Atlanta from which both his father and grandfather had graduated. After three years of theological study at Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania where he was elected president of a predominantly white senior class, he was awarded the B.D. in 1951. With a fellowship won at Crozer, he enrolled in graduate studies at Boston University, completing his residence for the doctorate in 1953 and receiving the degree in 1955. In Boston he met and married Coretta Scott, a young woman of uncommon intellectual and artistic attainments. Two sons and two daughters were born into the family.

In 1954, Martin Luther King became pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. Always a strong worker for civil rights for members of his race, King was, by this time, a member of the executive committee of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the leading organization of its kind in the nation. He was ready, then, early in December, 1955, to accept the leadership of the first great Negro nonviolent demonstration of contemporary times in the United States, the bus boycott described by Gunnar Jahn in his presentation speech in honor of the laureate. The boycott lasted 382 days. On December 21, 1956, after the Supreme Court of the United States had declared unconstitutional the laws requiring segregation on buses, Negroes and whites rode the buses as equals. During these days of boycott, King was arrested, his home was bombed, he was subjected to personal abuse, but at the same time he emerged as a Negro leader of the first rank.

In 1957 he was elected president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, an organization formed to provide new leadership for the now burgeoning civil rights movement. The ideals for this organization he took from Christianity; its operational techniques from Gandhi. In the eleven-year period between 1957 and 1968, King traveled over six million miles and spoke over twenty-five hundred times, appearing wherever there was injustice, protest, and action; and meanwhile he wrote five books as well as numerous articles. In these years, he led a massive protest in Birmingham, Alabama, that caught the attention of the entire world, providing what he called a coalition of conscience. and inspiring his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”, a manifesto of the Negro revolution; he planned the drives in Alabama for the registration of Negroes as voters; he directed the peaceful march on Washington, D.C., of 250,000 people to whom he delivered his address, “l Have a Dream”, he conferred with President John F. Kennedy and campaigned for President Lyndon B. Johnson; he was arrested upwards of twenty times and assaulted at least four times; he was awarded five honorary degrees; was named Man of the Year by Time magazine in 1963; and became not only the symbolic leader of American blacks but also a world figure.

At the age of thirty-five, Martin Luther King, Jr., was the youngest man to have received the Nobel Peace Prize. When notified of his selection, he announced that he would turn over the prize money of $54,123 to the furtherance of the civil rights movement.

On the evening of April 4, 1968, while standing on the balcony of his motel room in Memphis, Tennessee, where he was to lead a protest march in sympathy with striking garbage workers of that city, he was assassinated.

 
 

Selected Bibliography

Adams, Russell, Great Negroes Past and Present, pp. 106-107. Chicago, Afro-Am Publishing Co., 1963.

Bennett, Lerone, Jr., What Manner of Man: A Biography of Martin Luther King, Jr. Chicago, Johnson, 1964.

I Have a Dream: The Story of Martin Luther King in Text and Pictures. New York, Time Life Books, 1968.

King, Martin Luther, Jr., The Measure of a Man. Philadelphia. The Christian Education Press, 1959. Two devotional addresses.

King, Martin Luther, Jr., Strength to Love. New York, Harper & Row, 1963. Sixteen sermons and one essay entitled “Pilgrimage to Nonviolence.”

King, Martin Luther, Jr., Stride toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story. New York, Harper, 1958.

King, Martin Luther, Jr., The Trumpet of Conscience. New York, Harper & Row, 1968.

King, Martin Luther, Jr., Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? New York, Harper & Row, 1967.

King, Martin Luther, Jr., Why We Can’t Wait. New York, Harper & Row, 1963.

“Man of the Year”, Time, 83 (January 3, 1964) 13-16; 25-27.

“Martin Luther King, Jr.”, in Current Biography Yearbook 1965, ed. by Charles Moritz, pp. 220-223. New York, H.W. Wilson.

Reddick, Lawrence D., Crusader without Violence: A Biography of Martin Luther King, Jr. New York, Harper, 1959.

From Nobel Lectures, Peace 1951-1970, Editor Frederick W. Haberman, Elsevier Publishing Company, Amsterdam, 1972

This autobiography/biography was written at the time of the award and first published in the book series Les Prix Nobel. It was later edited and republished in Nobel Lectures. To cite this document, always state the source as shown above.

 
 

* Editor’s note: This biography uses the word “Negro”. Even though this word today is considered inappropriate, we have chosen not to change the original text to adhere to the copyright owner’s wish to keep the original version as a historical document.

 
 

Copyright © The Nobel Foundation 1964

TO CITE THIS PAGE:
MLA style: “Martin Luther King – Biography”. Nobelprize.org. 17 Jan 2012 http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1964/king-bio.html

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Is Your Senator Representing Charles and David Koch?


 

 

Billionaire industrialists Charles and David Koch look like they’re easy graders. Their Tea Party group released its rankings this week of senators and congressman who toe the Koch line most, and it gave a total of 44 A+s for the 112th Congress.

Americans for Prosperity, the Tea Party group funded by the Kochs, based its grades on opposition to affordable health care, clean air, alternative energy and net neutrality. Scores were also boosted if the elected official signed the tea party group’s anti-revenue pledge. 

In sum, the five senators who scored 100 percent on the Americans for Prosperity how-can-we-make-the-Kochs-richer test received $187,400 in campaign contributions from the Kochs and their allies. 

These senators are Ron Johnson (R-WI), Tom Coburn (R-OK), Mike Crapo (R-ID), Orrin Hatch (R-UT), and potential Republican vice presidential nominee Marco Rubio, a freshman from Florida. Indeed, Rubio, Johnson and Coburn have a lifetime of A+ scores! 

Though the brothers are worth about $42 billion, a little political donation here and there goes a long way. Factor in the brothers’ self-serving “philanthropy” with the Kochs’ numerous other nonprofit foundations and academic think tanks and you’ve exposed a vast echo chamber of perpetuating myths and distortions designed to make the Kochs richer.

 
 

While the Koch brothers use their enormous wealth to influence democracy in the Capitol, they’re also funding or supporting groups that aim to replace the values of working families with policies that make the Koch brothers richer. At the same time, the Kochs are working to bolster their clout with influential members of the political and media elite to favor devastating environmental developmentsthat would boost the soaring profits of Koch Industries.

To complement their political giving, the Kochs are also working with partners to curb access to the voting booth. The Kochs fund the American Legislative Exchange Council, which has helped facilitate the proliferation of voter suppression laws across the country. These laws would have their most adverse effect on students, seniors, minorities and disabled citizens.

At a local level, a Americans for Prosperity chapter helped make a community North Carolina school board race the most expensive in recent memory and favored candidates who pledged to resegregate public schools. They were ultimately rebuked by voters last year.

Exposing the Kochs reveals a pattern of selfish and manipulative priorities that consistently favor the most fortunate among us. In an era of Patriotic Billionaires, Occupy Wall Street and a decaying democratic process, the Koch brothers and their allies continue to demonstrate their satisfaction obstructing progress and social justice.

What do you think Martin Luther King Jr. would have to say about it?

Robert Greenwald is the director/producer of “Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch’s War on Journalism,” as well as many other films. He is a board member of the Independent Media Institute, AlterNet’s parent organization.

 

 

Watch the Video Below:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WFymBUsoNWY&feature=player_embedded#t=0s

Tea party speaker: ‘Force these Mexicans’ to build border fence



 

 

A speaker told a coalition of tea party groups in South Carolina on Monday that the U.S. could save $260 billion on the border fence if they “force these Mexicans to make $5 a day” to build it.

Speaking to the inaugural South Carolina Tea Party Coalition Convention, author Colin Heaton noted that he believed it would cost $400 billion to build a fence along the U.S. border if the government used labor unions.

“I proposed a two dual-fence system, multi-tiered wall with a no man’s land — I put a minefield in there, but they said no — intrusion detection systems like we use in detecting tunnels with nitrous and oxygen emission control emitters to detect carbon dioxide upon exhalation of someone digging a tunnel,” he explained. “Then you pump gas in there, — tear gas, nothing lethal. Just make it come out the other side.”

“But what you do, you take all these incarcerated illegal aliens — even give some of the guys who are U.S. citizens in the U.S. prison system, who make about 27 cents a day doing ridiculous work — kick out the union labor charging $28 an hour, force these Mexicans and these other people to make $5 a day, making more money than they made in Mexico anyway,” Heaton continued. “Put them to work building a security fence under military and local-state law enforcement administration. … Projected budget: $140 billion, which will pay for itself in four years once you get them the hell out of here.”

Heaton went on to propose a large, single federal detention system to incarcerate undocumented immigrants, “sort of like a KOA Campground with walls.”

The tea party speaker also drew a comparison between Adolph Hitler and President Barack Obama, but admitted that the current White House resident would not have caused the Holocaust.

“The only difference between Adolph Hitler and Barack Obama is that Barack Obama not overtly ethnically challenged with regards to various groups and religious paradigms,” he said. “But socialism is alive and well in Washington.”

Watch this video from CNN, broadcast Jan. 16, 2012.

 
 

Five Facts And One Big Lie: A Closer Look At The Oil Lobby’s Keystone XL Jobs Claims


With the 2012 presidential

Five Facts And One Big Lie: A Closer Look At The Oil Lobby’s Keystone XL Jobs Claims

 

With the election rapidly approaching, the oil lobby is pushing harder than ever to frame the Keystone XL Pipeline (KXL) as a “job creator.” However, TransCanada (the Canadian company behind the pipeline), the American Petroleum Institute (API), and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce have used massively inflated statistics. In fact, KXL would create few permanent jobs.

BIG LIE: KXL Will Create 20,000-465,000 Jobs

U.S. Chamber Of Commerce: KXL Will Create “Up To 250,000” Jobs. In a January 12, 2012, speech, Thomas J. Donohue, President of the U.S Chamber of Commerce, said: “Labor unions and the business community alike are urging President Obama to act in the best interests of our national security and our workers and approve the pipeline. We can put 20,000 Americans to work right away and up to 250,000 over the life of the project.” [Donohue Remarks, 1/12/11, via USChamber.com]

American Petroleum Institute: KXL Will Enable “More Than A Half A Million New U.S. Jobs By 2035.” In a January 4, 2012, speech API President Jack Gerard said: “We’ve seen it in the continued delay of the Keystone XL pipeline – the largest shovel-ready project promising 20,000 construction-related jobs over the next two years, enabling more than half a million new U.S. jobs by 2035.” [Gerard Remarks, 1/4/12, via API.org]

TransCanada: KXL Will Create 20,000 Jobs In Construction And Manufacturing And 465,000 Jobs Throughout the U.S Economy. In a January 10, 2012, press release, TransCanada claimed: “The $7 billion oil pipeline is the largest infrastructure project on the books in the U.S. right now. It would create 20,000 jobs: 13,000 in construction, 7,000 in manufacturing. […] As Keystone XL supports oil sands development, the impact on jobs in America becomes even more pronounced. The Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI) predicts a $521 billion increase in the U.S. gross domestic product and the creation of 465,000 U.S. jobs.” [TransCanada, 1/10/12]

FACT 1: Experts Say Those Numbers Are “Meaningless” And “Dead Wrong”

Energy Expert: The Analysis Supporting TransCanada’s Claims Is “Dead Wrong.” On October 27, 2011, the Council on Foreign Relations’ Michael Levi wrote: “The ‘economic impact study’ [on which the claim of 250,000 permanent jobs is based] in question appears to be a widely cited report by The Perryman Group. … The Perryman report has been criticized for the claim of 20,000 jobs along the pipeline route. I’ve seen less criticism of the far more impressive 250,000 number. … That’s a shame, since while the number is being invoked prominently, the analysis upon which it’s based is dead wrong. [Council on Foreign Relations, 10/27/11]

Environmental Economist: “These Gross Employment Figures Are Meaningless.” On September 9, 2011, environmental economist Andrew Leach wrote: “Sorry, TransCanada — the number which matters and on which decisions should be made is not how many people will be employed building the pipeline and supplying all of the services associated with building it, or the employment tied to the use of the oil transported. These gross employment figures are meaningless. As with GHG’s, only net impacts relative to the most likely alternative matter.” [Andrew Leach’s blog, 9/9/11, emphasis added]

Cornell University Global Labor Institute: TransCanada’s Estimate Is “So Opaque As To Make Meaningful Review Impossible.” A September 2011 analysis by the Cornell University Global Labor Institute states:

Perryman states that he received this data from TransCanada, but nowhere in the report does he provide the TransCanada input data (for construction expenditures and sourcing of inputs). Perryman does not even present summary detail as to the essentials regarding inputs (such as a breakdown of expenditures into major categories and assumptions regarding whether major inputs such as steel pipe are imported or sourced domestically or imported). Nor does the Perryman report provide adequate detail as to the nature of the job impacts estimated (such as a breakdown between direct, indirect, and induced). In fact, the lack of adequate data and detail render the report so opaque as to make meaningful review impossible. [Cornell University Global Labor Institute, September 2011, emphasis added]

FACT 2: Independent Assessment Found That KXL Jobs Would Create As Few As 50 Permanent Jobs

Cornell University Global Labor Institute: Based On TransCanada’s Numbers, “The Project Will Create No More Than 2,500-4,600 Temporary Direct Construction Jobs.” From Cornell University Global Labor Institute’s report: “A calculation of the direct jobs that might be created by KXL can begin with an examination of the jobs on-site to build and inspect the pipeline. The project will create no more than 2,500-4,650 temporary direct construction jobs for two years, according to TransCanada’s own data supplied to the State Department.” [Cornell University Global Labor Institute, September 2011]

Cornell: “Almost All” KXL Jobs Will Be Temporary – Permanent U.S. Jobs Could Be “As Few As 50.” From Cornell University Global Labor Institute’s report: “[I]t is also important to consider that almost all of the jobs (direct, indirect and induced) associated with Keystone XL will, of course, also be temporary. The operating costs for KXL are very minimal, and based on the figures provided by TransCanada for the Canadian section of the pipeline, the new permanent US pipeline jobs in the US number as few as 50. The other operating expenditures (for materials, supplies, services, electric power, property taxes, etc.) would comprise the bulk of operating expenses and would also have some job impacts. So considering a broad range of spin-offs, operating expenditures would have job impacts in the order of around 1,000 per year.” [Cornell University Global Labor Institute, September 2011, internal citations removed]

ThinkProgress Graphic Compares TransCanada’s Stats With Independent Figures: The following chart from ThinkProgress compares the high-end estimate of Cornell Global Labor Institute’s report and the TransCanada-commissioned Perryman Group’s estimate:

  

[ThinkProgress11/4/11]

FACT 3: TransCanada’s Estimates Include Jobs In Other Countries

CNN: TransCanada’s Estimates “Include Jobs In Canada.” From a December 14 CNNMoney article:

TransCanada numbers count each job on a yearly basis. If the pipeline employs 10,000 people working for two years, that’s 20,000 jobs by the company’s count.

The estimates also include jobs in Canada, where about a third of the $7 billion pipeline would be constructed. [CNNMoney,12/14/11]

FACT 4: Even TransCanada Acknowledges That Each Construction Job Will Only Last “One Year.”

TransCanada’s CEO Acknowledges That Each Job Will Only Last “One Year.” According to the Washington Post: “[TransCanada chief executive Russ] Girling that the 13,000 figure was “one person, one year,” meaning that if the construction jobs lasted two years, the number of people employed in each of the two years would be 6,500.” [Washington Post, 11/5/11]

TransCanada VP: Permanent Jobs “In The Hundreds.” On the November 11 edition of CNN’s The Situation Room, TransCanada Vice President Robert Jones stated: “We will have an integrated operation with the existing pipeline, so, you know, the numbers are literally technicians and such up and down the line. So you’re probably looking in the field from Montana to Houston in the hundreds, certainly not in the thousands, because those are construction jobs.” [CNN, The Situation Room, 11/11/11]

FACT 5: TransCanada Admitted They Already Purchased Much Of The Equipment

TransCanada CEO Admitted That $1.9 Million Worth Of Pipe And Equipment Has Already Been Manufactured – And Is Sitting In A Warehouse. According to the Washington Post:

TransCanada chief executive Russ Girling said Friday that the three-year review process has already imposed costs on his company, including $1.9 billion on pipe and other equipment stored in warehouses. […]

As for the 7,000 indirect supply chain jobs, the $1.9 billion already spent by TransCanada would reduce the number of jobs that would be created in the future. The Brixton Group, a firm working with opponents of the project, has argued that many of the indirect supply jobs would be outside the United States because about $1.7 billion worth of steel will be purchased from a Russian-owned mill in Canada. [Washington Post, 11/5/11]

Cornell Analysis: “About 25% Of The KXL Budget Has Already Been Expended.” From Cornell University Global Labor Institute’s report:

Construction has not yet started on KXL, but there have already been several years of activities preparing for possible construction. According to TransCanada’s interim financial statement released on July 28, 2011, the capital cost of the larger Keystone project (made up of the segments already completed and KXL) is $13 billion. Of this $13 billion, $7.9 billion had already been invested by June 30, 2011. Of the $7.9 already invested, US $1.7 billion is related to KXL. So prior to any actual construction, about 25% of the KXL budget has already been expended for activities including design, permitting, and materials procurement. […]

Money already spent in the past few years, plus money budgeted for the Canadian part of KXL, should not be presented as though it were part of future US-related spending pending the approval of the project. The money is gone and the work has been done (or soon will be). This spending will lead to few if any new jobs in the US. Likewise, some (and possibly all) of the money committed, but not yet spent, will be spent even if KXL is not built and should therefore not be considered in the analysis of the incremental spending that will occur should the project be approved. [Cornell University Global Labor Institute, September 2011, emphasis added, internal citations removed]

 

 

http://i2.ytimg.com/vi/1EfWErAqBag/default.jpg

Deception And Lies In The Media


 

 

 

 

Over at the unofficial think tank of the one percent — better known as the Heritage Foundation — Lachlan Markay claims Americans don’t much care about the ever-widening gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of the country. 

That’s no surprise. Heritage, after all, is lavishly funded by millionaires and billionaires for the clear purpose of expanding the gap between the rich and everyone else. It does so by churning out spurious arguments in favor of polices that redistribute wealth upwards, like the impressively dishonest claim that a cut in capital gains taxes paid almost exclusively by the wealthy would primarily benefit the non-wealthy — not to mention the callous argument that the poor are doing just fine because they have access to refrigerators. It then denounces anyone who dares study the inevitable results of these policies. The Heritage Foundation claiming people don’t care about the predictable results of a system rigged in favor of wealthy elites is a bit like Jesse James insisting nobody cares about bank robberies.

Markay’s argument has two components, neither of them convincing. First, he writes:

A new poll shows that, despite attempts by liberal protesters and politicians to inject class resentment into the national debate, Americans, by and large, remain unconcerned by income inequality.

Gallup reports that only 2 percent of Americans list the “divide between rich and poor” as the most important economic issue facing the country. Those findings come from an open-ended survey, meaning respondents were not confined to a pre-selected group of responses. Unemployment and the national debt top the list, but all told, a full 17 economic issues rank higher in the American political consciousness than income inequality.

Though Markay pretends they’re the same thing, there’s a difference between few people thinking income inequality is the nation’s biggest current economic problem and Americans “remain[ing] unconcerned by income inequality.” This difference is magnified by the fact that several of the economic issues mentioned more frequently than the “divide between rich and poor” have a great deal to do with that divide.

Read the full entry …

Tags: Heritage Foundation, Economy, Taxes
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