Archive for January 30th, 2012

Inner City Struggles


Welcome

We are proud to announce that InnerCity Struggle

has moved to a new location.

 

New Address:

124 North Townsend Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90063  


Phone and Fax:

323-780-7605 (Main Office)

323-780-7608 (Fax)

About Us

InnerCity Struggle has worked with youth, families and community residents for the past sixteen years to promote safe, healthy and non-violent communities in the Eastside.

We organize youth and families in Boyle Heights, unincorporated East Los Angeles, El Sereno and Lincoln Heights to work together for social and educational justice. InnerCity Struggle provides positive after-school programs for students to become involved in supporting our schools to succeed.

We have empowered students to reach their family’s dream of college. The work of InnerCity Struggle demonstrates that youth and parents working together are a powerful force for improving their communities and making real change.

InnerCity Struggle has also educated and empowered thousands of Eastside voters to be heard at the ballot box on critical issues impacting our communities.

RECENT NEWS

Los Angeles Unified students grade district’s new menu choices

August 29, 2011

It’s a reform effort years in the making in the nation’s second-largest school system. Only t…

» Read More

Defienden fondos para sus estudios

March 26, 2011

Aunque la mayoría de los alumnos de la secundaria Lincoln de Los Ángeles considera proseguir la educación sup…

» Read More

No More Looking Back: New Torres High Open to the Future

September 16, 2010

Over 2,000 students this week sat for the first time in classrooms at Esteban E. Torres High School-real…

» Read More

RECENT EVENTS

¡ADELANTE! Awards Dinner 2011

October 6, 2011 to

Save the Date InnerCity Struggle Annual Awards Dinner Thursday, October 6, 2011 ¡Adelante! 17 Years of In…

» Read More

6a Conferencia Anual para Padres

September 17, 2011 to

6a Conferencia Anual para Padres Cultivando lazos entre escuelas y comunidad …

» Read More

ICS Annual Awards Dinner

October 6, 2010 to

Save the Date InnerCity Struggle Annual Awards Dinner Wednesday, October 6, 2010 Contin…

» Read More

The Social Contract By Jean Jacques Rousseau


The Social Contract

by

Jean-Jacques Rousseau

eBooks@Adelaide
2010

This web edition published by eBooks@Adelaide .

Rendered into HTML by Steve Thomas .

Last updated Sun Aug 29 18:57:10 2010.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Licence
(available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/au/). You are free: to copy, distribute, display, and perform the work, and to make derivative works under the following conditions: you must attribute the work in the manner specified by the licensor; you may not use this work for commercial purposes; if you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under a license identical to this one. For any reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license terms of this work. Any of these conditions can be waived if you get permission from the licensor. Your fair use and other rights are in no way affected by the above.

eBooks@Adelaide
The University of Adelaide Library
University of Adelaide
South Australia 5005

Table of Contents

BOOK I

  1. Subject of the First Book
  2. The First Societies
  3. The Right of the Strongest
  4. Slavery
  5. That we must always go back to a First Convention
  6. The Social Compact
  7. The Sovereign
  8. The Civil State
  9. Real Property

BOOK II

  1. That Sovereignty is Inalienable
  2. That Sovereignty is Indivisible
  3. Whether the General Will is Fallible
  4. The Limits of the Sovereign Power
  5. The Right of Life and Death
  6. Law
  7. The Legislator
  8. The People
  9. The People (continued)
  10. The People (continued)
  11. The Various Systems of Legislation
  12. The Division of the Laws

BOOK III

  1. Government in General
  2. The Constituent Principle in the various Forms of Government
  3. The Division of Governments
  4. Democracy
  5. Aristocracy
  6. Monarchy
  7. Mixed Governments
  8. That all forms of Government do not suit all Countries
  9. The Marks of a Good Government
  10. The Abuse of Government and its Tendency to Degenerate
  11. The Death of the Body Politic
  12. How the Sovereign Authority maintains itself
  13. The Same (continued)
  14. The Same (continued)
  15. Deputies Or Representatives
  16. That the Institution of Government is not a Contract
  17. The Institution of Government
  18. How to Check the Usurpations of Government

BOOK IV

  1. That the General Will is Indestructible
  2. Voting
  3. Elections
  4. The Roman Comitia
  5. The Tribunate
  6. The Dictatorship
  7. The Censorship
  8. Civil Religion
  9. Conclusion

Table of Contents
Next

Last updated on Wed Jan 12 09:44:12 2011 for eBooks@Adelaide.

They’re Over 1000 Hate Groups In USA And Growing


Southern Poverty Law Center

Fighting HateTeaching ToleranceSeeking Justice


Active U.S. Hate Groups

Stand Strong Against Hate

Join people across the nation who are standing strong against the hate. Add yourself to our map as a voice for tolerance.

The Southern Poverty Law Center counted 1,002 active hate groups in the United States in 2010. Only organizations and their chapters known to be active during 2010 are included.

All hate groups have beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics.

This list was compiled using hate group publications and websites, citizen and law enforcement reports, field sources and news reports.

Hate group activities can include criminal acts, marches, rallies, speeches, meetings, leafleting or publishing. Websites appearing to be merely the work of a single individual, rather than the publication of a group, are not included in this list. Listing here does not imply a group advocates or engages in violence or other criminal activity.

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© 2012. Southern Poverty Law Center.

The Great Society Program


In 1963 poverty was at 22.6 percent by 1970 it dropped to 12.3 percent this according to US Senator Tom Harkin.

 

 

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