Posts from the ‘Immigration’ Category

Sheriff Joe To Arm Sheriff Deputies With Automatic Weapon To The Undocumented From Escaping Or Murder Them In COLD BLOOD

By Nicole Flatow on Nov 16, 2012 at 12:10 pm

A week after the infamous Sheriff Joe Arpaiosurvived a reelection campaignthat spotlighted his flagrant anti-Latino practices and misuse of government funds, the Maricopa County enforcer is back to work making “every effort” to target undocumented immigrants.

In a press release issued by his office yesterday, Arpaio touted several recent operations to chase down “suspected illegal aliens” that involved violence, injuries and some smuggled marijuana. And he is pledging to escalate this effort by arming all of his deputies with automatic weapons:

During one of the investigations on Wednesday of this week, Sheriff’s deputies tried to approach a vehicle they had observed at a high rate of speed, when the vehicle sped away, going off road driving through a barb-wire fence into the desert. The suspect vehicle sustained damage to include flat tires but continued to drive for about one mile before eight occupants, including the driver, fled on foot into the thick brush. Immediately deputies created a perimeter and with the use of the Sheriff’s helicopter and K-9 units, they located one suspect hiding in a backyard of a residence and all others hiding in a wash. […]

Sheriff Joe Arpaio says, “Once again the entry into Maricopa County from Mexico by illegal aliens does not seem to have subsided by evidence of numerous arrests made by my deputies. Aside from their determination to get away we will continue to make every effort to pursue and apprehend human smugglers as well as drug traffickers. More and more illegal aliens are attempting to escape which places my deputies in dangerous positions. In the near future I will be issuing automatic weapons for all my deputies”.

Setting aside the savage tone of the press release, Arpaio’s boast of expending vast county police resources to chase down individuals in the desert is misplaced at best. While Arpaio continues to “make every effort” to snag these individuals through violent means, less local police resources are available for addressing violent and property crimes. Instead, he is increasing the risk of violence going forward by pledging to arm all of his deputies with automatic weapons.

What’s more, Arpaio’s aggressive efforts put him and his department at risk of becoming the target of yet another lawsuit. This past June, the U.S. Supreme Court made clear in striking down many of the most controversial provisions of Arizona’s immigration law that immigration enforcement is primarily the purview of the federal government. While the court left in place one controversial provisions that requires police to ask individuals about their immigration status pursuant to an otherwise lawful police stop, the five-justice majority left the door wide open for a later lawsuit challenging improper enforcement of this provision once the law went into effect.

[h/t @TedHesson]





Latin Americans love Obama – so why the ‘collective shrug’ on reelection?

Latin Americans love Obama – so why the 'collective shrug' on reelection? (via The Christian Science Monitor)

Leading up to the United States presidential election, Latin Americans, like Latinos in the US, widely favored the reelection of President Obama. In fact, while attitudes about the US are conflicted here – and often far from glowing – America’s leader is widely respected. In the latest poll from…

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Key Element of Arizona Immigration Law Survives Ruling –

Key Element of Arizona Immigration Law Survives Ruling –

TUCSON — A decision by a federal judge on Wednesday paved the way for the most controversial section of Arizona’s sweeping immigration legislation, requiring the authorities to verify the status of people who they suspect are in the country illegally, to finally take effect.
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Charles Dharapak/Associated Press

Gov. Jan Brewer of Arizona at the United States Supreme Court in April during judicial debate over Arizona’s immigration law. A federal judge Wednesday let stand a key provision of the law.

Arizona: Judge Upholds Immigration Law (September 6, 2012)
Times Topic: Arizona Immigration Law (SB 1070)

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In denying a request by a coalition of civil rights groups to bar the provision, commonly referred to as “show me your papers,” Judge Susan Bolton of United States District Court in Phoenix adopted the same wait-and-see approach suggested by the Supreme Court in June, saying that the measure could be challenged “as interpreted and applied after it goes into effect.”

The decision, though, does not end the legal battles that have enmeshed the measure and other portions of the law for more than two years, challenging their validity and constitutionality all the way to the Supreme Court.

For law enforcement agencies that had taken a more benign approach to immigration enforcement, it poses a quandary, forcing them to balance conflicting obligations of going after illegal immigrants while keeping them on their side.

“All this does is amplify a problem that already existed,” which is establishing trust among people already reluctant to cooperate with the authorities, Sheriff Clarence W. Dupnik of Pima County said in an interview from his office here.

Hoping to validate concerns raised by the Supreme Court in its ruling, the civil rights groups presented several examples to bolster the argument that traffic stops and detentions would inevitably grow longer as a result of efforts by law enforcement officers to verify a person’s immigration status. The groups also used statements made by some state legislators — who spoke of illegal immigrants and Mexicans or, more generally, Hispanics, as one and the same — to prove that the immigration bill they passed was inherently discriminatory, a violation of the 14th Amendment’s equal-protection clause.

Judge Bolton dismissed the first contention and seemed to have ignored their other claim. She made no mention of it in her order, which ran 12 pages and quoted extensively from the Supreme Court’s ruling, as well as lower courts’ rulings on similar immigration laws challenged in other states.

She did, however, give the plaintiffs one measure of victory by ordering the state to stop enforcing an aspect of its immigration law that makes it a crime to harbor or transport illegal immigrants. She employed the same rationale used by the courts in Alabama and Georgia to block similar provisions, arguing that states cannot impose rules in areas already regulated by federal immigration laws.

Gov. Jan Brewer’s staff was still weighing Thursday whether to appeal the order, but the governor still hailed Judge Bolton’s ruling, saying that it put the state “one step closer to implementing the core provision” of its immigration law.

Cecillia Wang, director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Immigrants’ Rights Project, which is part of the civil rights coalition, said the judge “really missed an opportunity” to prevent the types of abuses she and others have claimed are already happening in places like Maricopa County, where Sheriff Joe Arpaio and his deputies have been vigorously using other state laws to go after illegal immigrants.

Judge Bolton’s order, Ms. Wang added, “puts the burden of defending constitutional rights on the victims of abuse by police and sheriff’s offices in Arizona.” Carlos Garcia, executive director of Puente, an advocacy group in Phoenix, said the ruling “will only expand the human rights crisis in Arizona” and the police will no longer be able to “protect and serve” Latinos, “only racially profile them.”

Sheriff Dupnik said his deputies were trained to “use common sense and good judgment” before they stop, detain or question a suspect. “This law,” he went on, “makes it no different.”

Lawsuits by the Justice Department and a similar roster of civil rights organizations that appeared before Judge Bolton were already challenging Sheriff Arpaio’s methods and intentions, saying they were intended to single out Latinos for enforcement actions.

In 2010, Judge Bolton issued a preliminary injunction against the show-me-your-papers provision. The injunction is still in place, though on Wednesday she gave the department and the State of Arizona 10 days to formally request its dismissal.

Arizona Gov. Jane Brewer Tell Obama To Stop Joking About Immigration Crisis

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May 8, 2010 |  1:04 pm